Using Windchimes Effectively in Feng Shui

By Kathryn Weber

??????????????????????????????????????Wind chimes are one of feng shui’s hardest working remedies. Their role is to bring aid in many forms – from lifting chi from a troubled area to suppressing energy in corners where there are negative stars to bringing you good news and help from influential people!With all they can do, wind chimes are a valuable source and important tool in your feng shui arsenal. In short, wind chimes have two main roles: to cure or energize.

But to get the most out of wind chimes, it’s important to note that there are several distinctions regarding wind chimes, such as type, number of rods, and so on.

Knowing these distinctions will help you use wind chimes effectively — and correctly – an important consideration if you are looking to achieve a specific result, such as greater recognition, more career help, or better health. Take a look at the information below to learn more about wind chimes and how to use them effectively in feng shui.

Wind chime Materials
Wind chimes are made of a number of materials: ceramic, glass, metal, or wood. The type of material selected will depend on what you are trying to achieve and where you want to place the wind chime.

Metal: Place in the west, NW, and north.
Wood/Bamboo: Place in the east, SE, and South
Ceramic/Glass: Place in the NE or SW

Hollow vs. Solid Rods
There is debate about rod types. Both solid rod and hollow rods work equally well. However, if you want to energize an area, such as your career sector in the north, you should always use hollow rods. That’s because hollow rods lift chi. Solid rods should be used when you are trying to press down chi, but hollow rods will also work just as well.

Rod Numbers Matter
As a general rule, the number of rods is relevant to where you are placing the wind chime and what you intend to use it for. You should also observe number placement.

That is, the number of rods should be correct for the area where you are using it, such as using four rods in the SE because four is the number of the SE. The number of rods best for each area can be found below.

To energize an area using wind chimes follow these recommendations:

North (career/Opportunities): Single metal wind chimes, bell, or six-rod metal hollow metal chimes.

NE, SW (relationships, personal growth, education): Ceramic or glass chimes. Use five, eight, or two rods.

East (family relationships, health): Bamboo or wooden chimes; three rods.

Southeast (wealth): Bamboo or wooden chimes; four rods. Or choose wind chimes with fish or water themes.

South (recognition, fame): Bamboo, wooden, or metal chimes with three, four, or 9 rods (9 is best).

West (children, creativity): Metal chimes with seven or six rods.

To overcome an affliction such as a toilet or problem area, use these wind chime guidelines

Wood chimes: place these in the NE or SW
Metal chimes: place a metal chime in the east or SE
Ceramic/glass: place in the north sector if there is an affliction

Some Wind chime Do’s and Don’ts

Don’t hang a wind chime over a door so that either you or your door hit it
Don’t hang wind chimes in trees. The metal in the tree causes the elements to clash. Wood chimes are OK in trees.
Don’t hang a wind chime over where you sit, eat, work, or sleep so that you are directly under it.

DO hang the appropriate wind chime for the direction your front door faces on either side of your front door if your door faces a parking lot, an oncoming road, or other obstacle, such as poison arrow, tree, etc.

DO hang a wind chime in an area where there are more than two doors in a straight line

DO use a 5-rod hollow or solid chime for bathrooms in east, SE, NW, S, or west sectors

DO use a hollow wood chime for bathrooms located in the center, SW, or NW sectors

DO use pagoda-shaped chimes with hollow rods as energizers

DO use six sets of six-rod hollow chimes to mark off a missing NW corner – helpful if you are looking to attract a man if you are single, gain more help from influential people, or help the patriarch of a household.

 

© K Weber Communications LLC
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